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Thursday, May 26, 2016

New Biology and Bioethics Online Courses for Adults and High School



Homeschool Connections is proud to announce that we are adding three new courses for the 2016/2017 School Year with Dr. Gerry Nadal. One course is for adults and the other two are for high school students. I will post the information for the adult course in a separate blog post soon.

Note: Homeschool Connections offers a large variety of science courses. Don't hesitate to email us at homeschoolconnections@gmail.com to inquire or visit our Course Catalog webpage.

TO REGISTER: Homeschool Connections Registration Page for Live, Interactive Courses

The details for the high school courses are below:

The Biology, Biotechnology, and Bioethics of the Life Issues, Part One
This is Part One of a 2-part course. Students are expected to also register for Part Two offered in the spring semester.
Class dates: Wednesdays, September 7 to December 14, 2016. No class November 23 for Thanksgiving.
Total classes: 14 live classes and 16 recorded lectures
Starting time: 1:00 PM Eastern (Noon Central; 11:00 Mountain; 10:00 Pacific)
Duration: 100 minutes (1 hour 40 minutes)
Prerequisite: Freshman-level Biology
Suggested grade level: 10th to 12th grade
Suggested credit: 1 full semester Advanced Biology, Science, or Bioethics
Fee: $225 if you register on or before July 15, 2016. $250 after July 15 for all 30 classes. ($275 after August 29)
Instructor: Gerard Nadal, Ph.D.
Course description: The material is at the level of advanced biology, but will not cover all of the material that a student would need to sit for the AP exam in biology. It is ideally suited for any family seeking to synthesize the science and teaching of the Church in a user-friendly manner. It is indispensable for any student aspiring to a career in the health sciences, or in education and ministry. At the end of the course of study, the student will be fully equipped to witness to the beauty of human life and the teaching of the Church in all of these areas. The student will also be fully equipped with all of the scientific evidence that shows how the Church has had it right all along.
            For over a century the Culture of Death has been ascendant, and in all of that time faithful Christians in general, and Catholics in particular, have been accused of not grasping the sciences of biology and  epidemiology. The principled teachings of the Catholic Church are actually rooted in the deepest realities of biology and the effects of behavior human persons. In this year-long course of study, Dr. Gerard M. Nadal brings his years of experience as molecular biologist, medical microbiologist, and Catholic apologist to bear on all of the life issues facing the western world. Each topic will initially focus on the relevant underlying biology, then consider the topic as an application of medical technology. Papers from peer-reviewed research journals, as well as governmental data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be utilized in most topics.  These will be used to illuminate the epidemiology indicating the destructiveness of the practice under consideration. All of the topic materials will be synthesized with relevant teaching from Catholic Encyclicals and teaching from the Catechism of the Catholic Church.
As the course progresses throughout the year the topics of cellular biology, molecular and Mendelian genetics, immunology, neurology, reproductive physiology, infectious diseases, pharmacology, epidemiology, embryology and developmental biology will be covered in depth.
Course outline:
In Vitro Fertilization
Genetic Engineering
Three-parent embryos
Surrogate Motherhood
Embryonic v. Adult Stem Cell Therapy
HIV/AIDS
STD’s
Cervical and Endometrial Cancers
Contraceptive methods and ectopic pregnancy
Chemical Abortion***
Brain Death and Organ Donation
Eugenics, Margaret Sanger, and the Population Control Movement
Embryology and Human Development
The link between breast cancer, abortion and the birth control pill.
The epidemiology of psychiatric sequelae after abortion
*** Please note that the methods of surgical abortion will not be treated in any depth, and may only be mentioned in the most general terms. At no time will pictures of aborted babies ever be presented. It is Dr. Nadal’s belief that such imagery is appropriate for college and graduate school curricula, but must be left to the discretion of parents with high school-aged children.
Course materials: TCatholic Bioethics and the Gift of Human Life 3rd Edition
by William E. May (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1612787029/catholictreas-20). Weekly handouts and resources on the Internet will also be used as the source material (provided free by the instructor)
Homework: Assigned readings from May's text, as well as other assigned reading. About 4 hours of reading per week will be necessary. Weekly quizzes will be multiple choice and true/false, graded by the computer for immediate feedback. Exams will be written essays.

Advanced Biology: College Level, Part One
This course is limited to 15 students. This is a two-part course. Part Two is offered in the Spring Semester. This course has not yet received approval from the College Board to be called AP on your transcript. However, it will well prepare you for the AP test in the spring and for college biology.
Class dates: Thursdays, September 8 to December 15, 2016. No class November 24 for Thanksgiving and December 8 for Feast of Immaculate Conception.
Total classes: 13 live classes and 16 recorded lectures
Starting time: 2:00 PM Eastern (1:00 Central; Noon Mountain; 11:00 Pacific)
Duration: 100 min. per class
Prerequisite: High School Biology required; High School Chemistry highly recommended and preferred.
Suggested grade level: 11th to 12th grade
Suggested high school credit: 1 full semester of Advanced Biology or Science
Fee: $250 if you register on or before July 15, 2016. $275 after July 15 for all 29 classes. ($295 after August 30)
Instructor: Gerard M. Nadal, Ph.D.
Course description: This two-semester course will introduce students to the principles of General Biology at a first year college level. The goal is to provide the most up-to-date treatment of contemporary biology and biotechnology, and to briefly treat the great ethical and moral questions of the day arising from the subject matter; in the classic model of a Catholic liberal arts education that stresses integration of the scientific and the moral magisterium of the Church. Students completing this course will be well prepared for the Advanced Placement Exam in Biology (Monday, May 9, 2016).
Part One (fall semester) will explore the principles of biology at the cellular and molecular level. Fundamental biochemistry, molecular and cytogenetics, transcription and translation, cellular respiration, cellular biology of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, cellular and organismal reproduction, Mendelian inheritance, and recombinant DNA technology are all of the main topics. Throughout both semesters, students will be taught how unit topics relate to principles of Darwinian Evolution, as understood and espoused by the contemporary biological community. The principles of Catholic bioethics will also be briefly discussed within units touching on contemporary topics in reproductive technologies.
Course materials: Campbell Biology 10th Edition (ISBN-10: 0321775651 or ISBN-13: 978-0321775658), (Available for rent at a much cheaper cost, http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321775651/catholictreas-20.)
Homework: Homework time varies by student, but an estimated 5 to 6 hours per week, in addition to attending the live, interactive classes, is not unreasonable, given the advanced level of material being studied. Homework will involve the outlining of one essay per week, consistent with the structure of the Advanced Placement Exam’s essay requirements.

TO REGISTER: Homeschool Connections Registration Page for Live, Interactive Courses

The Biology, Biotechnology, and Bioethics of the Life Issues, Part Two
This is Part Two of a 2-part course. Students who wish to join us midyear must obtain the instructor's permission first.
Class dates: Wednesdays, January 11 to May 3, 2017. No class March 1 for Ash Wednesday or April 12 for Holy Week.
Total classes: 16 live classes and 16 recorded lectures
Starting time: 1:00 PM Eastern (Noon Central; 11:00 Mountain; 10:00 Pacific)
Duration: 100 minutes for live classes (1 hour 40 minutes)
Prerequisite: Freshman-level Biology
Suggested grade level: 10th to 12th grade
Suggested credit: 1 full semester Advanced Biology, Science, or Bioethics
Fee: $225 if you register on or before November 15, 2016. $250 after Nov. 15 for all 32 classes. ($275 after Jan. 3)
Instructor: Gerard Nadal, Ph.D.
Course description: The material is at the level of advanced biology, but will not cover all of the material that a student would need to sit for the AP exam in biology. It is ideally suited for any family seeking to synthesize the science and teaching of the Church in a user-friendly manner. It is indispensable for any student aspiring to a career in the health sciences, or in education and ministry. At the end of the course of study, the student will be fully equipped to witness to the beauty of human life and the teaching of the Church in all of these areas. The student will also be fully equipped with all of the scientific evidence that shows how the Church has had it right all along.
            For over a century the Culture of Death has been ascendant, and in all of that time faithful Christians in general, and Catholics in particular, have been accused of not grasping the sciences of biology and  epidemiology. The principled teachings of the Catholic Church are actually rooted in the deepest realities of biology and the effects of behavior human persons. In this year-long course of study, Dr. Gerard M. Nadal brings his years of experience as molecular biologist, medical microbiologist, and Catholic apologist to bear on all of the life issues facing the western world. Each topic will initially focus on the relevant underlying biology, then consider the topic as an application of medical technology. Papers from peer-reviewed research journals, as well as governmental data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be utilized in most topics.  These will be used to illuminate the epidemiology indicating the destructiveness of the practice under consideration. All of the topic materials will be synthesized with relevant teaching from Catholic Encyclicals and teaching from the Catechism of the Catholic Church.
As the course progresses throughout the year the topics of cellular biology, molecular and Mendelian genetics, immunology, neurology, reproductive physiology, infectious diseases, pharmacology, epidemiology, embryology and developmental biology will be covered in depth.
Course outline:
In Vitro Fertilization
Genetic Engineering
Three-parent embryos
Surrogate Motherhood
Embryonic v. Adult Stem Cell Therapy
HIV/AIDS
STD’s
Cervical and Endometrial Cancers
Contraceptive methods and ectopic pregnancy
Chemical Abortion***
Brain Death and Organ Donation
Eugenics, Margaret Sanger, and the Population Control Movement
Embryology and Human Development
The link between breast cancer, abortion and the birth control pill.
The epidemiology of psychiatric sequelae after abortion
*** Please note that the methods of surgical abortion will not be treated in any depth, and may only be mentioned in the most general terms. At no time will pictures of aborted babies ever be presented. It is Dr. Nadal’s belief that such imagery is appropriate for college and graduate school curricula, but must be left to the discretion of parents with high school-aged children.
Course materials: TCatholic Bioethics and the Gift of Human Life 3rd Edition
by William E. May (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1612787029/catholictreas-20). Weekly handouts and resources on the Internet will also be used as the source material (provided free by the instructor)
Homework: Assigned readings from May's text, as well as other assigned reading. About 4 hours of reading per week will be necessary. Weekly quizzes will be multiple choice and true/false, graded by the computer for immediate feedback. Exams will be written essays.

Advanced Biology: College Level, Part Two
This is Part Two of a 2-part course. Students who want to join us midyear must seek the approval of the instructor first. Registration is limited to 15 students.
Class dates: Thursdays, January 12 to May 4, 2017. No class April 13 for Easter Break.
Total classes: 16 live classes and 16 recorded lectures
Starting time: 2:00 PM Eastern (1:00 Central; Noon Mountain; 11:00 Pacific)
Duration: 100 minutes per live class (1 hour 40 minutes)
Prerequisite: Advanced Biology, Part One (fall semester).
Suggested grade level: 11th to 12th grade
Suggested high school credit: 1 full semester of Advanced Biology or Science
Fee: $250 if you register on or before November 15, 2016. $275 after Nov. 15 for all 32 classes. ($295 after Jan. 4)
Instructor: Gerard M. Nadal, Ph.D.
Course description: This two-semester course will introduce students to the principles of General Biology at a first year college level. The goal is to provide the most up-to-date treatment of contemporary biology and biotechnology, and to briefly treat the great ethical and moral questions of the day arising from the subject matter; in the classic model of a Catholic liberal arts education that stresses integration of the scientific and the moral magisterium of the Church. Students completing this course will be well prepared for the Advanced Placement Exam in Biology (Monday, May 9, 2016).
Part Two (spring semester) will focus in depth on the various organ systems of the body, their anatomy and physiology, as well as comparative anatomy and physiology with other members of the animal kingdom. Human reproduction and embryology will comprise a special unit within the semester of study, along with a segment on developmental anomalies and the rapidly developing field of fetal surgeries and other interventional therapies. Also treated will be plant physiology and principles of ecology, ecosystems, biomes and conservation.
Course materials: Text: Campbell Biology 10th Edition (ISBN-10: 0321775651 or ISBN-13: 978-0321775658), (Available for rent at a much cheaper cost, http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0321775651/catholictreas-20.)
Homework: Homework time varies by student, but an estimated 5 to 6 hours per week, in addition to attending the live, interactive classes, is not unreasonable, given the advanced level of material being studied. Homework will involve the outlining of one essay per week, consistent with the structure of the Advanced Placement Exam’s essay requirements.

TO REGISTER: Homeschool Connections Registration Page for Live, Interactive Courses

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Top 10: Online Classes This Summer for Catholic Students

Top Ten List
Using Unlimited Access for Summer Learning


No matter where your children go to school in the fall and spring, you are welcomed to take classes with Homeschool Connections this summer. Whether you want your children to get a Catholic perspective in certain subjects, receive some remedial help in an area, or take an upper-level course not available at their school, we're here to help.

Homeschool Connections offers two types of courses that cover a wide span of subjects. Today, let's talk about our recorded, independent-learning courses that you can take at your own pace and on your own schedule. (If you prefer live, interactive classes for summer we posted about that yesterday here: Online Summer Classes for Middle and High School)

There are many different ways you can use Homeschool Connections' recorded classes through Unlimited Access to keep learning alive and fun over the summer. Here are ten ideas to get you started.

10. Take school with you.
We've had students take classes from hotel rooms, Grandma's house, the library, the car on the road, and even the beach. However, we don't recommend taking your laptop anywhere near sand! All you need for recorded classes is a power source, internet, and a computer. You should add ear buds or a headset to the list if you need privacy.

9. Plug the computer into the television.
This is a really fun way to learn together as a family. Pick a subject that everyone is interested in learning. It may be The Hobbit or World War II or American Sign Language or something completely different. Make some popcorn and watch together. You may need an HDMI cable and a newer TV (Mac users will need a converter). Recently, my teen added Chromecast to our laptop and that's what we use.

8. Pick a time that works best for you.
Recorded classes are available 24/7. You could watch classes first thing in the morning, getting them done early so the rest of the day can be spent outdoors. It you prefer, watch classes during lunch or just before bed in the evening. Pick the time that is going to help you keep up on your work throughout the summer.

7. Audit a course.
Watch a lecture each day and forgo the homework. For example, instead of taking 12 weeks for World History: 12 Inventions that Changed the World, watch the lectures over 12 days. When auditing, pick a subject that is easy for you. (For a course list, click here: Recorded Course Catalog.)

6. Buckle down on tough subjects.
Need help with algebra? Struggled with science last year? If so, buckle down and get to work. Set aside time each and every day (Sundays off!) and stick to the schedule. Complete all of the homework before moving to the next recorded lecture. If you want extra help, sign up for the optional grading support (Instructor Access).

5. Catch up on subjects for September.
Planning on taking Latin II next year but not quite ready? Perhaps illness or something else kept you from finishing Latin I this year. Whether you simply need a refresher or need to make up for lost time, there are a number of "Bootcamps" available in recording (math, Latin, and more).

4. Ask yourself, "What do I love?"
For example, do you get geeked about books? If so, choose a literature course on a book you love. Reread Romeo and Juliet as you watch Professor Pearce's lectures over a couple of weeks. Or Screwtape Letters, or Space Trilogy, or The Man Who Was Thursday. You can choose from over 40 literature courses.

3. Summer is a great time to hone your writing skills
Writing is a key skill for success in all other school subjects. Focusing on writing skills over summer will help you do better in history, literature, and more when fall arrives. Homeschool Connections writing courses range from basic, foundational courses to advanced, college-preparatory courses. Other courses that help you succeed in core subjects include: Note Taking Skills and How to Use Microsoft Word.

2. Keep a schedule and keep it simple. 
How many times have we all laid out grand plans, only to forget about them as the excitement wore off? Write out a reasonable schedule on a white board or print it and post it. Program your computer or phone to remind you each day. Do something tangible to keep you on schedule.

You don't need a complicated schedule to be effective. Pick just one or two subjects. For example, maybe you weren't able to make time for philosophy in the fall and spring, but you know it would help you a lot to learn it and it sounds interesting. Focus just on philosophy courses for summer.

1. Take courses that raise your heart to God. All of our courses are taught through the lens of the Catholic Church. If you'd like to get the Catholic perspective in history or literature, this is the place. We also offer a wide range of theology and philosophy courses that help students experience God's teaching.

Bonus: Unlimited Access means just that!
You have unlimited access to over 250 courses for your entire family. Yes, it's true! You can't beat the price ($30 per month!!!) and you can't beat the convenience. Middle school, high school, and adult students can easily learn year round with this independent learning program. It can be as easy or as complicated as you want to make it. It's YOUR program.

NOTE: If you prefer live, interactive classes for summer we offer those too. Click here to learn more: Online Summer Classes for Middle and High School

To learn more about our recorded, online, independent-learning classes, click here now:

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Online Summer Classes for Middle and High School


We are very excited to let you know we have scheduled several great live, interactive courses for the summer semester. Courses still opened for registration:
  • Professor Joseph Pearce will introduce high school students to G. K. Chesterton's Everlasting Man. This course is almost full, so I wouldn't wait to sign up. Added bonus: the instructor has a great English accent, which really is a necessity when reading Chesterton. Well, at least we think so.
  • Kevin O'Brien will teach  a high school course on C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien, because we can't ever get enough Lewis and Tolkien in our homeschools! (Mr. O'Brien doesn't have an English accent, but he is an actor so he could fake it if you ask him.)
  • To help our children keep up on their math skills and be ready for the next fall, Emily Nardozzi will teach a Math Boot Camp for middle school students. It's just the right amount for summer, leaving plenty of time for summer adventures outside.
  • Dr. Christine Hamilton will repeat her ever-popular Nutrition Science course this summer. Just for fun, she'll also teach an Entomology (Bugs!!!) course for the middle-school set. This is the course were personally most excited about. Our kids can't wait for this one.
  • Last, but not least, Professor Erin Brown Conroy will teach an upper-level Punctuation and Grammar course to give students a hand up for the fall. Who knew you could take advanced Punctuation and Grammar?! This course will help prepare you for college writing.
(If you prefer recorded, independent-learning classes that you can take on your own time, then check out Unlimited Access.)

This is going to be one fun summer! Here are all of the course details, big and small ... 

TO REGISTER: Homeschool Connections Registration Page for Live, Interactive Courses
Click on Summer 2016 Semester and click on Search

THE SCIENCE OF BUGS! (ENTOMOLOGY) 
Total classes: 8
Class dates: Mondays through Thursdays, June 6, 2016 - June 16, 2016 June 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16)
Starting time: 10:00 AM Eastern (9:00 Central; 8:00 Mountain; 7:00 Pacific)
Duration: 45 minutes
Prerequisite: None
Suggested grade level: 6th to 8th grade
Suggested credit: ½ semester Entomology or Science
Fee: $70 for all 8 classes.
Instructor: Christine Hamilton, Ph.D.
Course description: Fun lighthearted study of the insect world.  We will learn about insect type, habitat, sounds and some yummy recipes (really!). Pests, workers, artists—the intrepid insects of the world fascinate, annoy, and benefit humankind. From butterflies to bees to the lowly cockroach, insects are an integral part of the natural environment, making their mark on culture through rhyme and lore. What causes fireflies to blink? Did you ever wonder about the origin of "Sleep tight, don't let the bed bugs bite?" Let's delve into the insect world and see what we can learn.
Course outline:
1. Fastest
2. Largest
3. Longest
4. Most Numerous
5. Most Spectacular
6. Smallest
7. Misc. (Bioluminescence, loudest, most toxic)
8. Recipes (crunchy, chewy)
Course materials: Everything provided FREE by the instructor.
Homework:  Research insect of your choice for report at the end of the course.

MATH FOUNDATION BOOT CAMP FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS 
Total classes: 8
Class dates: Mondays through Thursdays, June 13 to June 23, 2016
Starting time: 11:30 AM Eastern (10:30 Central; 9:30 Mountain; 8:30 Pacific)
Duration: 1 hour
Prerequisite: Completion of at least one middle school level math course
Suggested grade level: Geared toward 6th, 7th, and 8th grade. However, 9th graders are welcomed who would like to strengthen their math foundation.
Suggested credit: 1/2 semester Math
Fee: $95 for all 8 classes.
Instructor: Emily Nardozzi
Course description: The focus of this course will be to strengthen students' skills in working with fractions, decimals, and percents. Fractions are the most misunderstood concept in all of mathematics and many students cringe when they come across them in a math problem. The goal of this course is to make sure that students are able to add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions, decimals, and percents with ease and confidence.
Course outline:
Mon., June 13: Identify, compare, order, and demonstrate equivalent relationships between integers, rational numbers in decimal, fraction, and percent notation
Tues., June 14: Represent, order, and compare integers and describe their absolute value
Wed., June 15: Identify, compare, and perform the four basic operations relating to rational numbers in fraction, decimal, and percent notation.
Thurs., June 16: Identify, compare, and perform the four basic operations relating to rational numbers in fraction, decimal, and percent notation.
Mon., June 20: Evaluate expressions using order of operations
Tues., June 21: Evaluate expressions using order of operations
Wed., June 22: Solve equations and inequalities
Thurs., June 23: Review
Course materials: None, all materials will be provided FREE by the instructor.
Homework: 1 quiz per day will be given with approximately 5-10 problems, these should take around 10-15 minutes


“I CALL YOU FRIENDS” C. S. LEWIS AND J. R. R. TOLKIEN
Total classes: 8
Class datesMondayTuesdayWednesday, Thursday, June 20 through June 30.
Starting time: 1:00 PM Eastern (Noon Central; 11:00 AM Mountain; 10:00 AM Pacific)
Duration: 55 minutes
Prerequisite: None
Suggested grade level: 9th to 12th grade
Suggested credit: ½ semester Literature
Fee: $110 for all 8 classes.
Instructor: Kevin O’Brien
Course description: Two of the greatest Christian writers of the 20th century were also close friends - C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien - a friendship that awakened Lewis to the Faith, but that also may have faltered because of the demands of the Faith.  We examine the relationship of these two men, the ups and downs of their friendship, and how they influenced one another’s writings.
Course outline

Class one: Overview of the course and of the setting and times into which Lewis & Tolkien were born.
Class twoSelections from Surprised by Joy, the life of C.S. Lewis
Class three: Selections from Joseph Pearce's biography of J.R.R. Tolkien
Class four: Tolkien's "On Fairy Stories" and the Night Talk that started Lewis' conversion
Class five: Other influences on Lewis' faith: Chesterton and the Inklings.
Class six: The Inklings and the development of the writings of Lewis and Tolkien: how they influenced one another.
Class seven:  Lewis' marriage and Tolkien's reaction to it: trouble in the friendship.
Class eight: We examine the legacy of each author, review what we've learned, and bring the course to a conclusion.
Course materialsSurprised by Joy by C.S. Lewis, Tolkien: Man and Myth by Joseph Pearce should both be purchased by students and at least one of the two books should be read ahead of time, before the first class session. Other material will be brief selections from works and letters of the two authors, and will be provided free by the instructor in class or as PDF files.
Homework: Completing the assigned reading for each class; taking six quizzes and one essay exam. Estimated homework time each week: 4 hours.


HEALTH SCIENCE: NUTRITION
Total classes: 8
Class dates: Mondays through Thursdays, July 11 to July 21 (July 11, 12, 13, 14, 18, 19. 20, 21)
Starting time:  10:00 AM Eastern (9:00 Central; 8:00 Mountain; 7:00 Pacific)
Duration: 45 minutes
Prerequisite: At least a 9th grade level of understanding of science.
Suggested grade level: 9th to 12th grade
Suggested credit: ½ semester Health Science
Fee: $70 for all 8 classes.
Instructor: Christine Hamilton, Ph.D.
Course description: Teaches the basic concepts of healthy eating. We will learn what food means to the body and gain a better understanding of its necessity.
Course outline:
1. Healthy Eating - proper nutrition can help prevent a number of health conditions including (but not limited to); Type 2 Diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and obesity. Planning a balanced diet and understanding nutrition labels.
2. Protein - necessary for muscles, skin and hair.
3. Carbohydrates - the body's primary source of energy converted to glucose.
4. Fats - help synthesize fat soluble vitamins (A,E,D,K).
5. Vitamins - Essential vitamins including; A, B, Complex C, D, E, K and folate.
6. Minerals - essential minerals include; calcium, iron, zinc, iodine and chromium.
7. Water - we are 60% H2O, our brain is 70% H2O.
8. Proper Diet - Good nutrition keeps muscles, bones, organs and other body parts strong.
Course materials: Food for Today: Student Activity Paperback by Helen Kowtaluk, ISBN # 0078616468 (www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0078616468/catholictreas-20).
Homework: Students will be asked to bring a canned or boxed food item to class with them to learn about label reading and meanings. Students will keep a three-day food journal to track short-term eating habits. Expect daily homework at approximately 30-45 minutes each day.

THE EVERLASTING MAN by G. K. CHESTERTON
Total classes: 6

Class dates: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, August 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18.
Starting time: 1:00 PM Eastern (Noon Central; 11:00 AM Mountain; 10:00 AM Pacific)
Duration: 55 minutes
Prerequisite: Complete reading The Everlasting Man by G. K. Chesterton before the first day of class
Suggested grade level: 9th to 12th grade
Suggested high school credit: ½ semester credit for Literature or English
Fee: $75 for all 6 classes.
Instructor: Joseph Pearce
Course description:  The Everlasting Man is G. K. Chesterton’s classic work of Catholic Apologetics. The book's thesis is ultimately that the Incarnation is central to an understanding of history. Chesterton takes on the claim that man is simply the product of evolution, arguing that Christianity provides the True explanation for the genesis and purpose of human life. Chesterton wrote the book as a rebuttal to popular author H.G. Wells, whose secularist The Outline of History was influential at the time (1920’s). As Dale Ahlquist, president of the American Chesterton Society, says, “Of all of Chesterton’s literary monuments, this is perhaps his greatest, for he eloquently and concisely packs the whole human story between the covers of one book.” In this course, we will unpack that story and study it together over six classes.
Course outline:
Class one: Part I, chapters 1-3
Class two: Part I, chapters 4-6
Class three: Part I, chapters 7-8
Class four: Part II, chapters 1-2
Class five: Part II, chapters 3-4
Class six: Part II, chapters 5-6
Course materials: G. K. Chesterton, The Everlasting Man (Ignatius Press), 978-0-89870-444-0
Homework: Completing the assigned reading for each class; taking six quizzes. Estimated homework time each week: 3 hours.


HIGH SCHOOLWRITING ESSENTIALS 5: PUNCTUATION AND GRAMMAR II
Fully Understanding Punctuation & Grammar
College Preparatory
Total classes: 6
Starting time: 11:30 AM Eastern (10:30 Central; 9:30 Mountain; 8:30 Pacific)
Class dates: Week One: Monday through Thursday. Week Two: Monday and Tuesday. August 22, 23, 24, 25: 29, 30; 2016
Duration:  55 minutes
Prerequisite: HIGH SCHOOL WRITING ESSENTIALS 1: Essential Punctuation and Grammar I
 and HIGH SCHOOL SIMPLIFIED WRITING 1: All-Encompassing Foundational High School Writing Skills (Live, interactive courses or Unlimited Access recorded courses)
Suggested grade level: 9th to 12th grade
Suggested credit: 1/2 semester Writing or English
Fee: $99 for all 6 classes.
Instructor: Erin Brown Conroy, MA, MFA
Course description:  This course continues your student’s punctuation and grammar instruction and exercises, taking your student to college-level understanding. Students will move beyond common understanding to mastering the skills. If you want your teen to never struggle with punctuation and grammar and be able to be skillful in upper-level, college-prep punctuation and grammar, this is the course for you.
Course outline:
Class 1: The power of punctuation; what punctuation does (and doesn’t do) for your writing, and how you can harness that power
Class 2: Complete comma understanding and practice: identification of commas with multiple clause sentences (the sentence/non-sentence trick)
Class 3: Complete comma understanding and practice: typical comma errors and editors’ choices with commas
Class 4: Common, unusual, and rare comma placement in common, unusual, and rare places
Class 5: Semicolons, colons, and commas used together correctly
Class 6: End punctuation issues, quotation mark errors, and quotes within quotes issues
Class 7: Citations, references, footnotes, and research-centric punctuation
Class 8: Mastering punctuation in the SAT and ACT
Course materials: TBA, ordering information forthcoming. Word 2007 or later version or the ability to convert documents to Word-compatible documents.
Homework: Daily quizzes, which are graded automatically by the computer for instant feedback. Course includes skill-building sheets to complete with corrections guide. Personalized question time will be offered in class to insure a strong understanding of concepts.

TO REGISTER: Homeschool Connections Registration Page for Live, Interactive Courses
Click on Summer 2016 Semester and click on Search


We hope that this selection of summer online classes will be helpful to you and your family. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to email us at homeschoolconnections@gmail.com. You can visit us online at www.homeschoolconnections.com

Note: This post contains affiliate links.

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Why Should I Learn Punctuation & Grammar in High School?

Registration is open. Click here: Homeschool Connections Registration (Click on the semester and Writing, then click on Search.)

Should high school student continue with punctuation and grammar studies? Yes! Too often, we consider such studies to be too basic for older students. However, punctuation and grammar is taught at a completely different level in the upper grades compared to their grammar school lessons. It gives students the tools needed for college and business writing.



Correct punctuation and grammar help others to fully understand us. If you want to do well in school and your job, then mastering punctuation and grammar is critical.

The elements of tone, speed, and even the timbre (such as whispering, rasping, or growling a word) communicate meaning to others. The voice carries power, enabling our message to be fully understood. The plain printed words on the page can’t give us nuance. But punctuation can. With punctuation, our original meaning can be more closely translated to the page.

Grammar refers to both the order of words and choosing the right word. When it comes to certain word orders on the page, there is a right way to write. There are right words to use—a proper choice of words and a proper order of words. However, some words are not appropriate for different audiences or purposes. Grammar gives us a formal, clear way to place our words in order, to get our meaning across to the reader.

Whether we like it or not, based on our words, people judge us. If a person uses grammar incorrectly (not choosing the right word or word order), people catch it. The reader realizes and remembers incorrect grammar. Based on what the reader sees, you may be (unconsciously or consciously) put into a category of educated or not educated. You’re labeled. Whether the label is true or not, we are now viewed with that tar.

The label, not educated, puts you into a category where others may make assumptions about you that, most likely, aren’t true. Judgment may lead others to a lack of respect. Based on incorrect assumptions, poor decisions may be made (like whether or not the person wants to hire you for a job). Grammar matters, for many reasons.

Honing your punctuation and grammar skills in high school will help you beyond writing assignments. It will help you achieve high grades in other subjects. I can confidently tell you this: more often than not, poor punctuation and grammar can sink the ship that carries your top grade. You can have everything going for you, and those small, basic punctuation and grammar errors can mess things up and take away your A, fast.

We hope you'll consider joining us for High School Essential Writing 1: Punctuation and Grammar and/or High School Writing Essentials 5: Punctuation and Grammar II (College Preparatory). Each course is only six weeks, but they are six weeks that will change everything for the better. Below are all the course details for the upcoming semesters. The first course is also available as a recorded, independent-learning courses through our Unlimited Access program. The second will be available in the fall of 2016.

Registration is open. Click here: Homeschool Connections Registration (Click on the semester and Writing, then click on Search.)


High School Writing Essentials 5: Punctuation and Grammar II *NEW
College Preparatory
Total classes: 6
Class dates: Week One: Monday through Thursday. Week Two: Monday and Tuesday: August 22, 23, 24, 25: 29, 30; 2016
Starting time: 11:30 AM Eastern (10:30 Central; 9:30 Mountain; 8:30 Pacific)
Duration:  55 minutes
Prerequisite: High School Writing Essentials 1: Essential Punctuation and Grammar I
 and High School Simplified Writing 1: All-Encompassing Foundational High School Writing Skills (Live, interactive courses or Unlimited Access recorded courses)
Suggested grade level: 9th to 12th grade
Suggested credit: 1/2 semester Writing or English
Fee: $99 if you register on or before March 15, 2016; $119 after March 15 for all 6 classes. ($139 after Aug. 14)
Instructor: Erin Brown Conroy, MA, MFA
Course description:  This course continues your student’s punctuation and grammar instruction and exercises, taking your student to college-level understanding. Students will move beyond common understanding to mastering the skills. If you want your teen to never struggle with punctuation and grammar and be able to be skillful in upper-level, college-prep punctuation and grammar, this is the course for you.
Course outline:
Class 1: The power of punctuation; what punctuation does (and doesn’t do) for your writing, and how you can harness that power
Class 2: Complete comma understanding and practice: identification of commas with multiple clause sentences (the sentence/non-sentence trick)
Class 3: Complete comma understanding and practice: typical comma errors and editors’ choices with commas
Class 4: Common, unusual, and rare comma placement in common, unusual, and rare places
Class 5: Semicolons, colons, and commas used together correctly
Class 6: End punctuation issues, quotation mark errors, and quotes within quotes issues
Class 7: Citations, references, footnotes, and research-centric punctuation
Class 8: Mastering punctuation in the SAT and ACT

Course materials: TBA, ordering information forthcoming. Word 2007 or later version or the ability to convert documents to Word-compatible documents.
Homework: Homework: Daily quizzes, graded automatically by the computer for instant feedback. Course includes skill-building sheets with corrections guide. Personalized question time will be offered in class to insure a strong understanding of concepts. 

HIGH SCHOOL WRITING ESSENTIALS 1: Essential Punctuation and Grammar I (HS 9-1)
* This course is offered during four time slots in the fall semester only; the course will not be offered in the spring semester.
* This is a two-part course; take the 9-1 and 9-2 courses together, to receive one full semester of credit (14 weeks of classes).
* Though not required, it is recommended to sign up for 9-1 and 9-2 courses in the same Time Offering (same time slot) within each semester.
Total Classes: 6
Class dates and starting times:

Mondays, September 12 to October 17, 2016
11:30 AM Eastern (10:30 Central; 9:30 Mountain; 8:30 Pacific)
OR
Mondays, September 12 to October 17, 2016
2:00 PM Eastern (1:00 Central; Noon Mountain; 11:00 Pacific)
OR
Wednesdays, September 9 to October 14, 2016
10:00 AM Eastern (9:00 Central; 8:00 Mountain; 7:00 Pacific)
OR
Fridays, September 7 to October 12, 2016
10:00 AM Eastern (9:00 Central; 8:00 Mountain; 7:00 Pacific)
Duration: 55 minutes
Prerequisite: No class prerequisites. Your student will need Word 2007 or later version or the ability to convert a document to a Word-compatible document.
Suggested grade level: 9th grade; all grade levels accepted
Suggested credit: ½ semester Writing or English. Combine with High School Simplified Writing 1 for a full semester credit.
Fee: $89 if you sign up on or before July 15, 2016; $99 after July 15 for all 6 classes. ($119 after Aug. 30)
Instructors: 
Lisa Mladinich (Mondays) and Sharon Hamric-Weis, BSEd, JD (Wednesdays and Fridays)
Course description: This is an essential writing course for all high school students. Give your high school student exactly what’s needed for high school and college writing—including the confidence and the ability to use punctuation and grammar well. Don’t let your student struggle—master commas, tense, colons, semicolons, dashes, ellipses, and more. This class will give your student the strong foundation needed to finally master the details that are holding him or her back from writing well. Sentence constructions in the course are upper level, meant to challenge and prepare your student for upper-high school and college courses.
Course outline:
Class 1: Mastering commas in a series and commas with conjunctions using complex sentences
Class 2: Mastering commas and clauses and tough constructions, including multiple ideas, connectors, and transitions
Class 3: Mastering tense, competing punctuation, quotations, dashes, and ellipses
Class 4: Sticky-pair sentence construction (if-then, not only-but also) and tough grammar in upper-level constructions
Class 5: Mastering colons and semicolons with leading sentence constructions
Class 6: Mastering tricky punctuation details, end punctuation, and the most common grammar challenges
Course materials: eBook: Elements of Writing for High School Students by Erin Brown Conroy. Ordering information forthcoming
Homework: Weekly quizzes graded automatically by the computer for immediate feedback. Estimated two to four hours per week for homework outside of class time, depending on the student’s ability.

HIGH SCHOOL WRITING ESSENTIALS 5: Punctuation and Grammar II (HS X-5) *NEW
College Preparatory 
* This course is for students who want to confirm and excel in their skills.
* This course is offered before school begins, during the Fall Semester, and during the Spring Semester.
* Note: Though offered on different days, this course’s dates fit the schedule to immediately follow the HS 9-1 Punctuation and Grammar I course. Sign up for both Punctuation and Grammar I and II courses during the Fall and Spring Semesters.
Total classes: 6
Class dates: Mondays, October 24 to December 5, 2016. No class November 21 for Thanksgiving Break.
Starting time: 10:00 AM Eastern (9:00 Central, 8:00 Mountain; 7:00 Pacific)
Note: Because this course’s dates “fit” the schedule to immediately follow the weeks of HS 9-1 Punctuation and Grammar I, you can sign up for both Punctuation and Grammar I and II courses during the Spring semester if desired.
Duration:  55 minutes
Prerequisite: Required. HIGH SCHOOL WRITING ESSENTIALS 1: Essential Punctuation and Grammar I (HS 9-1). Prerequisite can be taken as a live course or through Unlimited Access. Your student will also need Word 2007 or later version or the ability to convert a document to a Word-compatible document.
Suggested grade level: 9th to 12th grade
Suggested credit: 1/2 semester Writing or English. Add another course for full credit.
Fee: $99 if you register on or before November 15, 2016; $119 after Nov. 15 for all 6 classes. ($139 after Oct. 16)
Instructor: Lisa Mladinich
Course description:  This course continues your student’s understanding of punctuation and grammar with instruction and exercises taking your student to college-level understanding. Students will move beyond common understanding to mastering the skills. If you want your teen to never struggle with punctuation and grammar and be able to be skillful in upper-level, college-prep punctuation and grammar, this is the course for you.
Course outline:
Class 1: The power of punctuation; what punctuation does (and doesn’t do) for your writing, and how you can harness that power
Class 2: Complete comma understanding and practice: identification of commas with multiple clause sentences (the sentence/non-sentence trick)
Class 3: Complete comma understanding and practice: typical comma errors and editors’ choices with commas
Class 4: Common, unusual, and rare comma placement in common, unusual, and rare places
Class 5: Semicolons, colons, and commas used together correctly
Class 6: End punctuation issues, quotation mark errors, and quotes within quotes issues
Class 7: Citations, references, footnotes, and research-centric punctuation
Class 8: Mastering punctuation in the SAT and ACT

Course materials: TBA, ordering information forthcoming. Word 2007 or later version or the ability to convert documents to Word-compatible documents.
Homework: Homework: Weekly quizzes, with an estimated two to three hours per week for homework outside of class time. Quizzes are graded automatically by the computer for instant feedback. Course includes skill-building sheets with corrections guide. Personalized question time will be offered in class to insure a strong understanding of concepts. 

HIGH SCHOOL WRITING ESSENTIALS 5: Punctuation and Grammar II (HS X-5)
College Preparatory
* This course is for students who want to confirm and excel in their skills. College preparatory.
Total classes: 6
Class dates: Mondays, February 27 to April 3, 2017
Starting time: 11:30 AM Eastern (10:30 Central; 9:30 Mountain; 8:30 Pacific)
Note: Because this course’s dates “fit” the schedule to immediately follow the weeks of HS 9-1 Punctuation and Grammar I, you can sign up for both Punctuation and Grammar I and II courses during the Spring semester if desired.
Duration:  55 minutes
Prerequisite: Required. HIGH SCHOOL WRITING ESSENTIALS 1: Essential Punctuation and Grammar I (HS 9-1). Prerequisite can be taken as a live course or through Unlimited Access. Your student will also need Word 2007 or later version or the ability to convert a document to a Word-compatible document.
Suggested grade level: 9th to 12th grade
Suggested credit: 1/2 semester Writing or English. Add another course for full credit.
Fee: $99 if you register on or before November 15, 2016; $119 after Nov. 15 for all 6 classes. ($139 after Feb. 19)
Instructor: Lisa Mladinich.
Course description:  This course continues your student’s understanding of punctuation and grammar with instruction and exercises taking your student to college-level understanding. Students will move beyond common understanding to mastering the skills. If you want your teen to never struggle with punctuation and grammar and be able to be skillful in upper-level, college-prep punctuation and grammar, this is the course for you.
Course outline:
Class 1: The power of punctuation; what punctuation does (and doesn’t do) for your writing, and how you can harness that power
Class 2: Complete comma understanding and practice: identification of commas with multiple clause sentences (the sentence/non-sentence trick)
Class 3: Complete comma understanding and practice: typical comma errors and editors’ choices with commas
Class 4: Common, unusual, and rare comma placement in common, unusual, and rare places
Class 5: Semicolons, colons, and commas used together correctly
Class 6: End punctuation issues, quotation mark errors, and quotes within quotes issues
Class 7: Citations, references, footnotes, and research-centric punctuation
Class 8: Mastering punctuation in the SAT and ACT
Course materials: TBA, ordering information forthcoming. Word 2007 or later version or the ability to convert documents to Word-compatible documents.
Homework: Homework: Daily quizzes, with an estimated two to three hours per week for homework outside of class time. Quizzes are graded automatically by the computer for instant feedback. Course includes skill-building sheets with corrections guide. Personalized question time will be offered in class to insure a strong understanding of concepts. 

Registration is open. Click here: Homeschool Connections Registration (Click on the semester and Writing, then click on Search.)